FREE EVALUATIONS





« FITWORKS PERFECT POSTURE AND FUNCTION | FITWORKS PERFECT POSTURE AND FUNCTION »
Wednesday
Jul122017

Evaluations

Forward Head, Hunch Back,
Rolled Shoulders, Evaluation


Evaluation #1 Forward Head:  Stand with your back against a wall. Make sure your heels, butt, upper back all touch the wall at the same time. If your head doesn’t touch the wall you have a forward head.

Evaluation #2 Hunch Back: Stand with your back against a wall. Make sure your heels and upper back touch the wall at the same time. If your butt doesn’t touch the wall, you have a hunch back. Notice your head isn’t touching the wall either.

Evaluation #3  Rolled shoulders: Stand with your back against a wall. Make sure your heels, butt, and upper back all touch the wall at the same time. If your shoulders don’t touch the wall, you have rolled shoulders. Also, stand looking into a mirror, with your arms hanging down your side. Does the face of your hands show? If so, you have rolled shoulders. Only the edge of your hands should be seen (thumb, first finger).

Evaluation #4  follow up:  Stand with your back against a wall. Make sure your heels, butt, upper back, shoulders and head all touch the wall at the same time. If so, you have perfect posture from the side view.

Check your evaluation carefully. Make sure you have the correct
information.  Always remember, it’s not “if” you will line-up all the joints in your body it’s “when”. I have been doing this for 15 years. I have worked on more than 5,000 people and 15 doctors, that’s Medical Doctors and Chiropractors who were very impressed. I’ve worked on 55 nurses correcting their posture and they were also very impressed. Body builders who could bench 500 pounds said they would never pick up another barbell or dumbbell again after I taught them this program. All five of them said to me, “No one ever impresses me when it comes to exercise and Gary you have changed my life! I’m no longer in pain, and I have learned something new exercising  with you.” I have worked on every athlete you can think of and put them back together and enhanced their game to a level they never thought they could reach. It’s been very rewarding for me.


Curvature  S/C Evaluation

Evaluation #1 Curvature: Curvature can be an “S” curve or a “C” curve in the spine. Find a friend to help you with this evaluation. First, lay face down on the floor keeping your head straight and your arms down to your side with your feet about 12 inches apart. Have your friend pull on your ankles to straighten you out. Your friend needs to look at the muscle in your back. If the muscles are even from right to left then your spine is straight. If the muscles are different sizes from right to left we need to make a note of those differences. I like to look at the back muscles as 4 sections. The upper back has a right and left and the lower back has a right and a left.  Keep this in mind as you look at the muscles of the back.

Example #1 Curvature “C” Left: Let’s say your back muscles on the upper and lower left are bigger than the upper and lower right. If that is the case, then you would have a “C” curve to the left. The muscle is pulling the spine in the direction of the stronger muscle.

Example #2 Curvature “C” Right: Let’s say your back muscles on the upper and lower right are bigger than the upper and lower left. If that is the case then you would have a “C” curve to the right. The muscle is pulling the spine in the direction of the stronger muscle.

Example #3 Curvature “S”: Let’s say the right upper and left lower back muscles are both bigger. If that is the case then the upper is being pulled to the right and the lower is be pulled to the left in a “S” curve

Example #4 Curvature “S”: Let’s say the left upper and right lower back muscles are both bigger. If that is the case then the upper is being pulled to the left and the lower is be pulled to the right in a “S” curve.

Evaluation #5  Follow-up: Lay face down, have your friend look at the muscle in your back. If the muscles are even from right to left then your spine is straight.
Check your evaluation carefully make sure you have the correct information to decide the best exercise to correct a Curvature S/C spine.  


Sciatic Ache, SIJ, Sitting on Tail Bone
Evaluation


Evaluation #1 Sciatic Ache:  Let’s identify what muscles are sore, one side of the hip, or both sides. That’s the (piriformis, gemellus superior and inferior, obturator internus and externus) muscles and they are deep behind the (gluteus maximus and medius) or butt. The origin is (anterior sacrum, insertion, greater trochanter of femur) or side of the tail bone and upper leg. This means your sacrum is moved back (posterior) and those muscles are being pulled or stretched. That’s why they are sore. The other sore place may be the (SIJ, Sacral lilac Joints), low on your back, down on your hips [one hip or both]. There about 4 inches between each SIJoint. The muscles are (erector spinae, latissimus dorsi). The other sore place may be (pubic symphysis) pubic bone in the top, front, center of your both legs. The muscles are (adductors, pectineus, brevis, longus). All, or some of these muscles are sore because the joints are in the wrong place. That’s why they’re contracting more than they should trying to stabilize the joints causing sore, stiff, and tired muscles.   

Evaluation #2 SI Joint: Lay on your back with your knees up (hip knee flexion). Get close enough to a wall so that the tip of the toes touch the wall comfortably. If you measure it the tip of the toes to your waist line is approximately 30 inches. Now, place a level on top of your knees. Are the knees level? Is the lower knee the hip that is sore? If so that SI joint is out of place and the hip (ilium) is being pulled back. One hip can be back and one in the right place, yet you may still feel sore muscles in both. Or both SI Joints are moving and they both are creating sore muscles around the hips. Make a note of what you’re learning in your evaluation.

Evaluation #3 SI Joint: Follow the same instruction as #2, above.
Is one knee higher than the other? Is the higher hip sore? Make a note
of what you’re learning in your evaluation.

Evaluation #4 Sitting on Tail Bone: Does it hurt to sit on a hard bench or chair? Does it feel like you’re sitting on your tail bone? Do you feel pressure or a restricted nerve at the lowest part of your spine (L4, L5)?
Lay face down and have someone touch your tail bone (sacrum) do they feel little 1/8 inch dia. bony spots all over the tail bone surface, spaced about 1 1/2 inches apart? If you answered yes to these questions then your tail bone (sacrum) is back to far or in the wrong position. For the sacrum to be in the right place it should be hard to touch because it’s so deep. Make a note of what you’re learning in your evaluation.


Knocked Knees or Bowed Legs, Knee Discomfort, Evaluation

Evaluation #1 Knocked Knees:  When standing with your knees touching, look down at your ankles.  Are your ankle far apart? If so, then you have knocked knees. I always measure the distance between the ankles so, as time went on, I could measure the person’s progress.
Stand with your back up against a wall, with your heels, glutes, upper back, and head touching the wall. If you can’t do that because your glutes (butt) is out too far, that’s an anterior pelvic tilt. This is same reason you have knocked knees. Remember to re-evaluate yourself as you go, just to check your progress.
 Evaluation #2 Bow Legged: First, just stand up straight and look down at your legs, do they bow out? Try this, put your ankles together, is the space between your knees greater that ½ inch? If so, you have bowed legs. I always measure the distance between the person’s knees so as time went on I could measure the person’s progress.
Evaluation #3  Follow up: When standing, the ankles should touch and your knees should have a ½ inch space between them for Perfect Posture and Function. This way the meniscus and cartilage will wear evenly, the inflammation on the medal side of your knee should go away.
These are just muscle skeletal imbalances (musculoskeletal) imbalances …nothing more, nothing less. This is simple stuff and all you need to do is know the right muscles to build and then stretch every muscle in your body to get more flexible because that will speed the process of lining-up all the joints and soon you will have perfect posture and function. It’s not “if” it’s “when” all the joints line-up.
            
          
Sway Back or Flat Back, Low Back Ache
Evaluation


Evaluation #1 Sway Back:  Stand with your back against a wall. Make sure your heels, butt, and upper back all touch the wall at the same time. If you can pass your hand between you and the wall at the curve of your low back, then you have a Sway Back. Your hand should NOT pass through. There should be a curve in your low back approximately one inch from the wall to your spine for all the vertebrae to be parallel to each other having even compression on each disc.

Evaluation #2 Check Which Glute (butt) is Stronger or Weaker:  Lay face down (pronation), arms crossed elbows out in front, and both legs straight. Lift one leg off the floor about 2 feet (hip extension) which glute is stronger? Which glute is weaker?  Right or Left? This is very important because when you work out, you will need to do more reps on the weak glute and less on the stronger. Example: 20 reps. on the weak glute and 10 reps. on the strong glute. Keep testing yourself until both glute muscles are the same strength. Then do the reps even on both sides.

Evaluation #3 Flat Back:  Stand with your back against a wall. Make sure your heels, butt, and upper back all touch the wall at the same time. If your low back touches the wall, then you have a Flat Back. There should be a curve in your low back approximately one inch from the wall to your spine.

Evaluation #4 Follow-up: Stand with your back against a wall. Make sure your heels, butt, upper back and head all touch the wall at the same time. Your hand should not pass through the curve in your low back. There should be approximately one inch from the wall to your spine. Then, all the vertebrae will be parallel to each other, which will cause even compression on each disc when loaded.  

Clients have asked me many times over the years, how long will it take to line up and stabilize my hips?... Well after 17 years of working personally, that’s one on one with more than 5,000 people. I will say this, the person with the strongest core muscle will line up and stabilize their hips the faster.
Outward Feet, Fallen Arch,
Evaluation

Evaluation #1 External rotation: Stand look down are both of your feet, are they going outward? maybe one is out more than the other?. If so you have external rotation at the ankles. Your feet should almost be straight out in front of you while you walk.

Evaluation #2 External rotation: Stand in front of a mirror and bend one knee (knee flexion) is the bent knee and ankle and foot all lined up with your hip? if any of those joints turn outward, you have (external rotation) at that joint.Try one leg at a time and make a note for your evaluation.  

Evaluation #2 External rotation: Now, standing on one leg, Is that ankle falling in (pronation) or out (supination)  If it’s solid with on movement at the ankle then the ankle is supported by the muscle and you’re done. Repeat the evaluation on the other leg.is the ankle still? or falling in or out.

Evaluation #3 External rotation: First just stand up straight then look down at your legs, do they bow out? or do your knees go in and touch before the ankles do? If so that’s knocked knees. Try this, put your ankles together, is the space between your knees greater that ½ inch if so you have bowed legs. If knees touch before ankles do then you have knocked knees, either one is effecting whether your feet go outward or inward.
 I always measured the distance between the persons knees or ankles so as time when on I could measure the persons progress.
Evaluation #4  follow up:  Your evaluation will show you what needs to be corrected. When you evaluate yourself and your hips knees, ankles all line up your done.
Note: most of the time the external rotation at the hip, knee, ankles and the foot falling inward (pronation) that person will have knocked knees. Internal rotation at the hip knee or ankles that person is usually bow legged and has the foot falling out (supination) at the ankle.  
These are just muscle skeletal imbalances ( musculo-skeletal) imbalances are nothing more or less. This is simple stuff; all you need to do is know the right muscles.
Inward Feet, Weak Ankles, Evaluation

Evaluation #1 internal rotation: Stand look down are both of your feet going inward? maybe one is in more than the other? Make a note. If so you have internal rotation at the ankles. Your feet should almost be straight out in front of you while you walk.

Evaluation #2 internal rotation: Stand in front of a mirror and bend one knee (knee flexion). Now you are standing on one leg, is the hip, knee, ankle and foot  lined up? if so then your good. If not, maybe there going inward ( internal rotation). Notice the hip, knee, ankle, foot, do they internally rotate? try one leg at a time and make a note for your evaluation.  

Evaluation #3 internal rotation: Now, look at the leg you are standing on. Is the ankle falling out ward (supination),or solid with no movement? If it’s solid and supported by the muscle then you’re done. Repeat and test the other leg. If it’s the ankle is rolling inward and out ward, lets correct it.

Evaluation #4 internal rotation: Now stand up straight then look down at your legs, do they bow out? try this, put your ankles together, is the space between your knees greater that ½ inch if so you have bowed legs. This is part of what is causing the feet to fall out (supination) and in some cases internal rotation at the ankles to.

Evaluation #5  follow up:   Your evaluation will show you what needs to be corrected or maybe your close, when you evaluate yourself and your hips knees, ankles all line up your done.
Note: most of the time the external rotation at the hip, knee, ankles and the foot falling inward (pronation) that person will have knocked knees. Internal rotation at the hip knee or ankles that person is usually bow legged and has the foot falling out (supination) at the ankle.  
These are just muscle skeletal imbalances ( musculo-skeletal) imbalances are nothing more or less. This is simple stuff, all you need to do is know the right muscles.